Violence Against Women Shouldn’t Be Scrubbed From Television For Politically Correct Reasons

For several years now, the BBC Radio 4 review programme Front Row has been more or less explicitly campaigning against crime drama involving depictions of violence against women. When the BBC first broadcast the first season of Happy Valley, John Wilson interviewed writer Sally Wainwright, and he supplemented high praise for Wainwright’s work with challenging questions about the dramatic treatment of violence against women. At the time of the third season of The Fall, Samira Ahmed took Gillian Andersen to task over the violence towards women portrayed in earlier seasons. And around the time the third season of Broadchurch was being shown on ITV, John Wilson, interviewing David Tennant, held the actor’s feet to the fire in connection with the representation of rape in the drama. Read More…

Why Is There A Media Consensus That Women Are Oppressed?

In as much as it is animated by a desire for bona fide neutral coverage, recent debates about broadcast media impartiality are welcome. But one theme which, it seems, no one has started to talk about is how impartial broadcasters are vis-à-vis gender matters, though the subject is a vital one. It can often seem as though inadequate thought has been put into what impartiality in this domain means.

Despite differences between them, a large number of mainstream feminists agree that women in the West live under patriarchy, which means that women’s subjugation is “structural”, and that they, women, constitute a discrete oppressed class. Read More…